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Leak details 4.0 GHz Core i9-7900X CPU sporting ten cores

Leak details 4.0 GHz Core i9-7900X CPU sporting ten cores
Leak details 4.0 GHz Core i9-7900X CPU sporting ten cores
The 175 W TDP deca-core processor will likely succeed the current Broadwell-E Core i7-6950X if these specifications prove to be true.

We already know that Intel may be planning on expanding the Core ix family with a new Core i9 series of CPUs, but additional rumors have emerged to add even more fuel to the fire.

The screenshot below was purportedly taken from the benchmarking tool SiSoft Sandra clearly showing some vital core specifications of the supposed Core i9-7900X. Accordingly, the processor should be shipping with ten full cores plus Hyper-Threading for 20 simultaneously threads and a standard clock rate of 4.0 GHz plus Turbo Boost up to 4.5 GHz. TDP is subsequently very demanding at 175 W compared to 91 W on the popular Core i7-7700K. Aside from the CPU, the unverified screenshot also shows the tested motherboard as the "X299 Aorus Gaming 7". Aorus, of course, is well-known for its high-end enthusiast-level gaming laptops and hardware.

The double-digit processing cores could be Intel's response to the AMD Ryzen series which has so far shown excellent performance for the price in multi-threaded workloads. Intel has yet to confirm or deny any of these rumors, but this could potentially all change come Computex 2017 next week.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 05 > Leak details 4.0 GHz Core i9-7900X CPU sporting ten cores
Allen Ngo, 2017-05-26 (Update: 2017-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.