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Kindle Fire rooted just days after launch

Kindle Fire rooted just days after launch
Kindle Fire rooted just days after launch
A member of XDA-Developers has successfully rooted the Amazon tablet with simple-to-follow instructions

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As one of the least expensive dual-core tablets in the market, the Kindle Fire could attract even more potential buyers if root access were possible on the device to allow for custom ROMs, mods tweaks.

User death2all110 of xda-developers.com has accomplished just that in merely a couple of days after the launch of the Amazon tablet. His detailed instructions to root can be seen on his post here, where all users will need is a PC, the SuperOneClick 2.2 app and the Android SDK.

This is still very early, however, so a rooted Kindle Fire may not provide all that much variety for users as of now since custom programs have yet to surface. While there is little to gain for non-developers, it will be interesting to see what user-created content and firmware updates the open community can cook up, especially when more than 5 million units are already out in the open. We wouldn’t be surprised if Ice Cream Sandwich found its way on the Kindle Fire either, since Google recently released its source code this week.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 11 > Kindle Fire rooted just days after launch
Allen Ngo, 2011-11-17 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.