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HTC Quattro tablet with Tegra 3 leaks

HTC Quattro tablet with Tegra 3 leaks
HTC Quattro tablet with Tegra 3 leaks
The 10.1-inch tablet will reportedly ship with 1GB RAM, Bluetooth 4.0 and Beats Audio speakers by early 2012

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It was revealed a few days ago that HTC may have been hard at work on its next generation tablet, but more concrete evidence has surfaced today courtesy of pocketnow.com.

According to the source, HTC CEO Peter Chou himself confirmed the HTC tablet as the Quattro. The 10.1-inch tablet will apparently run on the Tegra 3 platform, have a 1280x768 resolution display, 1GB RAM, microSD reader, Bluetooth 4.0, 16GB SSD and even Beats Audio speakers. The latter can be found in certain HTC smartphones and HP notebooks, such as the Sensation and ProBook 5330m.

On the software side, the Android tablet will likely be compatible with Ice Cream Sandwich, although we wouldn’t be surprised if the device shipped with Honeycomb first with an ICS update later. It would also be quite useful if the Quattro is backwards compatible with the expensive HTC Scribe Pen that originally shipped with the HTC Flyer.

The HTC Quattro is expected to be available by early 2012, likely at around the same release windows as the Tegra 3 Acer tablets. If all goes as planned, these manufacturers would join Asus as one of the first companies to offer quad-core tablets at the consumer level.

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Allen Ngo, 2011-11-18 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.