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HP unveils the new 13-inch Envy 2015 notebook

HP unveils the new 13-inch Envy 2015 notebook
HP unveils the new 13-inch Envy 2015 notebook
Refreshed series will have a brighter look and an arched lid for improved ergonomics.

After unveiling the Spectre x360 2-in-1, Envy Note 8 tablet, and HP Spectre X2 detachable, HP doesn't want us to forget about the classic laptop form factor with the latest 13.3-inch Envy notebook.

  • 13.3-inch FHD or QHD
  • Intel Skylake Core i3/i5/7 CPU
  • Up to 8 GB RAM
  • Up to 512 GB SSD
  • 4x USB 3.0, 1x HDMI, SD reader
  • Bang & Olufsen speakers
  • 12.95 mm thickness, 2.8 pounds

The redesigned aluminum look is 2 mm thinner than the outgoing generation while the keyboard keys have been improved with a more satisfying travel of 1.2 mm. The rounded corners and edges are quite similar to the refreshed EliteBook series and it's perhaps unsurprising that the high-end consumer-oriented Envy series is looking more and more like its business counterparts.

A feature of the new Envy, however, is its arched lid at the rear of the notebook. This is similar to the Envy 15 we reported earlier at IDF in that it's designed to lift the base and keyboard at an angle when the lid is opened. This allows for both better ventilation through the bottom of the notebook and a more comfortable typing experience. The drawback, of course, is that there can be no ports on the rear.

The 13.3-inch Envy will be available later this month starting at about $850 USD. Expect our full review to follow as we move closer to launch.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > HP unveils the new 13-inch Envy 2015 notebook
Allen Ngo, 2015-10- 7 (Update: 2015-10- 7)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.