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Blackberry teases us with a first look video of the new Blackberry Motion

Blackberry Motion. (Source: Evan Blass)
Blackberry Motion. (Source: Evan Blass)
Blackberry has also given more information on phone specifications and confirmed that they will continue to make phones with physical and virtual keyboards.

Last weekend, Blackberry announced their new Blackberry Motion smartphone at the Middle-Eastern GITEX 2017 exhibition show. In addition to the 4 GB of RAM, 5.5-inch 1080p screen, 4000 mAh battery, and IP67 water and dust resistance that were already confirmed, Crackberry states that the mid-range SoC used will be the Snapdragon 625, rather than the initially rumored Snapdragon 645. The Snapdragon 625 is an older 14 nm octa-core which was released in mid-2016 but remains popular in mid-range handsets released in the last few months. The Motion features a 12 MP f/2.0 rear camera and an 8 MP front-facing camera.

While it is launching first in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, a Dutch retailer listed the Motion on their website along with an original price of EU€499 (US$590), which is now showing EU€469 (US$555), indicating that Europe should receive the phone in the next month or two. Keep in mind that EU prices usually include tax.

In related news, Blackberry has also tweeted to say that they will continue to make phones with physical and virtual keyboards. The motion isn’t an indication that they are dropping physical keyboards.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 10 > Blackberry teases us with a first look video of the new Blackberry Motion
Craig Ward, 2017-10-14 (Update: 2017-10-14)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.