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Android 6.0 Marshmallow usage remains low

Android 6.0 Marshmallow usage remains low
Android 6.0 Marshmallow usage remains low
Google statistics show a a rise of just half a percent for the latest version of Android.

The proliferation of Android 6.0 Marshmallow has been slower than expected. According to Google Dashboard, the adoption rate of the latest Android OS has been flat at just 0.5 percent compared to 0.3 percent a month earlier. The data was collected by tallying up all Android smartphones that have accessed the Play Market during a 7-day period ending on December 7, 2015.

Android Lollipop (5.0 and 5.1) makes up 29.5 percent of all Android smartphones recorded during the 7-day period, which is up from 25.6 percent last month. To break it down even further, Android 5.0 and 5.1 make up 16.3 percent and 13.2, respectively, compared to 15.5 percent and 10.1 percent a month earlier. Android 4.4 KitKat experienced a small decline from 37.8 percent to 36.6 percent.

Android 4.1 to 4.3 Jelly Bean experienced a much larger decline from 29.0 percent to 26.9 percent. A breakdown of Jelly Bean versions is shown below.

Older Android versions saw a downward trend in usage. Android 4.0.3 to 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich is down to 2.9 percent from 3.3 percent last month while 2.3.3 to 2.3.7 Gingerbread slipped to 3.4 percent from 3.8 percent. Finally, Android 2.2 Froyo remains at just 0.2 percent.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 12 > Android 6.0 Marshmallow usage remains low
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-12-10 (Update: 2015-12-10)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.