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Acer Aspire One 722 netbook coming soon

Acer Aspire One 722 netbook coming soon
Acer Aspire One 722 netbook coming soon
New netbook will reportedly carry the “water drop” design, as well as an upgraded processor and additional battery life compared to the Aspire One 721.

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While Acer has made public its plans to focus more on tablets and higher-end hardware, the company still relies quite a bit on netbooks, and will reportedly release an updated model of the Aspire One 721.

Appropriately named Aspire One 722, this new 11.6-inch upgraded version will sport an eye-pleasing blue “water drop” design on the chassis. According to NotebookItalia, this design was introduced earlier this year at the Mobile World Conference for the Aspire One D257, so Acer may be starting to incorporate the “water drop” into more of its line of notebooks.

Internally, expect a few hardware upgrades in the Aspire One 722 compared to its previous model. While the screen resolution will remain at 1366x768 pixels, the processor is expected to be upgraded to a 1GHz AMD Fusion C-50 APU. Additionally, the model could carry stereo speakers, compared to the monaural Aspire One 721. All in all, the Aspire One 722 should be offering an extra hour of battery life for a total of 7 hours.

Pricing and availability of the Aspire One 722 are not yet known, but will hopefully be announced once Acer decides to officially reveal the netbook.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 04 > Acer Aspire One 722 netbook coming soon
Allen Ngo, 2011-04-21 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.