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Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6-inch, WiFi) T560N Tablet Review

Nino Ricchizzi (translated by Bernie Pechlaner), 01/16/2016

Welcome. Samsung's Galaxy Tab E invites users to explore the world of tablets. The brand-new and inexpensive entry-level tablet leaves us with a favorable impression overall, but the lack of power prevents an even better score.

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Right at the end of the year, Samsung releases a new entry-level 9.7-inch tablet. Equipped with a quad-core processor, 1.5 GB of RAM, and 8 GB of storage, the Tab E offers just the basics - but at a low entry-level price of 180 Euro (~$200). Even at this price point, a certain standard can be expected and the series offers two cameras and an HD display; 3G is optional and costs 20 Euro (~$22) more. We are taking a look at the WiFi-version of the Tab E to see how it stacks up to competitors like the Lenovo Tab 2 10, the Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3 and the Medion Lifetab S10345. Of course we are also going to mention tablets from other manufacturers during our review and will take a look at higher-priced devices as well - for example the Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7, which costs three times as much.

Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
Processor
Graphics adapter
Memory
1536 MB 
Display
9.6 inch 16:10, 1280x800 pixel, capacitve touchscreen (5 fingers), IPS, glossy: yes
Storage
8 GB eMMC Flash, 8 GB 
, 5 GB free
Connections
1 USB 2.0, Audio Connections: audio combo-jack, Card Reader: microSD, Sensors: acceleration sensor
Networking
802.11 b/g/n (b/g/n), Bluetooth 4.0, GPS
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 8.9 x 242 x 150 ( = 0.35 x 9.53 x 5.91 in)
Battery
5000 mAh Lithium-Ion, Battery runtime (according to manufacturer): 8 h
Operating System
Android 4.4 KitKat
Camera
Primary Camera: 5 MPix CMOS, Autofokus, HD-Videos mit 30 fps
Secondary Camera: 2 MPix CMOS, Fixfokus
Additional features
Speakers: mono speaker, Keyboard: virtual, 24 Months Warranty, fanless
Weight
488 g ( = 17.21 oz / 1.08 pounds), Power Supply: 56 g ( = 1.98 oz / 0.12 pounds)
Price
180 Euro

 

Visually, the Galaxy Tab E looks quite similar to other mobile Samsung devices and in fact has an uncanny resemblance to the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 Neo smartphone. In contrast to the Galaxy Tab S2, which costs 400 Euro ($435), Samsung uses a case made from plastic, which the company claims to be "fabric-style" - likely because of the pattern on the back.

As far as the construction is concerned, Samsung did everything right. The different sections fit together without gaps and the corners are rounded nicely. Thanks to the rough back panel the tablet is non-slip. The 5 MP camera protrudes slightly and features a chrome bezel. The Samsung logo is not chrome-plated though, which is different from many smartphones and tablets. 

Weighing in at 490 g, the Tab E isn't one of the lightest tablets out there. Other competitors in this price bracket - for example the Lenovo Tab 2 A10-70 and the Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3 - weigh about as much though.

The tablet can't be opened up easily, which is something Samsung probably intended. The only way to get to the inside necessitates the removal of the display. Consequently it's also not possible to swap out the battery.

The plastic parts ...
... fit together well.
Access to the inside ...
... is not something Samsung seems to want.
8 GB isn't a lot - but at least an expansion is possible.
The right side houses the volume control and the power button.
A USB port is located on the upper edge.

Connectivity

Spreadtrum SC7730S provides processing power. The 32-bit ARM quad-core (Coretex A7) CPU runs at up to 1300 MHz and is augmented by 1.5 GB of system RAM. Although it costs the same, the Lenovo TAB 2 comes with 2 GB. 

The review slate comes with 8 GB of flash storage; about 5 GB are user accessible. The storage can be expanded with a microSD card up to 128 GB. Since App2SD is supported, installed applications can be relocated to the SD card.

The Tab E has the power and the headphone jacks on the upper edge, which is different from its upscale sibling.

The inexpensive review tablet doesn't feature MHL or NFC and OTG isn't supported, either.

Right side: volume, power button
Right side: volume, power button
Bottom
Bottom
Top: USB port, audio combo-jack
Top: USB port, audio combo-jack
Left side: microSD slot
Left side: microSD slot

Software

The pre-installed OS Android 4.4 Kitkat  is a bit behind the times - we'll have to wait and see if Samsung decides to offer an update to a never version.

Operating the tablet is generally possible without an stutters, although animations sometimes lag a little. Users who normally work with more powerful tablets are more likely to notice this behavior. On their homepage, Samsung promises a better multitasking functionality, which allows programs to be used in parallel. The applications have to support this feature, however. During our test, YouTube and a browser ran in parallel without a hitch.

We should also mention here that the Tab E doesn't support S Voice. 

As shipped, the Tab E not only contains the standard, but also some third-party apps (which can be uninstalled if so desired). Overall, the software package is far from generous. Aside from the well-known Google-programs, Samsung only preinstalled six additional apps.

Home screen
Home screen
As shipped, the installed apps ...
As shipped, the installed apps ...
... only take up a little more than one page.
... only take up a little more than one page.
The options-screen
The options-screen
Multiple windows open
Multiple windows open

Communication & GPS 

Wireless communication is courtesy of a WLAN module operating at 2.4 GHz. According to the specs, the IEEM 802.11 b/g/n standard supports speeds of up to 600 Mbit/s.

To check the WLAN reception, we conduct two tests. For the first, we are one floor above our router (AVM Fritz!Box 7490). Here, the signal quality is quite good at -48 dBm (signal strength at 78 %). We also test the signal strength right next to the router: in this case, we measure -22 dBm (signal strength100 %). 

Our Tab E doesn't support other mobile communication standards, although there is a 3G version which supports both 3G and 4G networks. The surcharge at this time is about 20 Euro (~$22).

To establish the location, the tablet can make use of both GPS and GLONASS. The connection process took quite a while inside, even though the apartment is located on the top floor (5th) of the building. Outdoors, the connection is established quickly and accurately.

WLAN connectivity one floor above the router
WLAN connectivity one floor above the router
WLAN connectivity at a distance of one meter
WLAN connectivity at a distance of one meter
GPS reception indoors
GPS reception indoors
GPS reception outdoors
GPS reception outdoors

As far as the GPS is concerned, there are noticeable differences in quality between the Tab E and the bike-specific Garmin Edge 500, which of course is a purpose-oriented design. Even though the tablet still does well overall, the professional device is much faster and more accurate.

GPS location services with the Galaxy Tab E ...
GPS location services with the Galaxy Tab E ...
... measured during a longer trip.
... measured during a longer trip.
Professional systems ...
Professional systems ...
... like the aformentioned Garmin GPS ...
... like the aformentioned Garmin GPS ...
... are more accurate.
... are more accurate.

Cameras & Multimedia

The Galaxy Tab E features two cameras. The main unit is on the back and comes with a resolution of 5 MP. The front-facing unit has a resolution of only 2 MP. Neither camera features an LED flash and only the rear-facing camera supports autofocus. Video recording is possible at the HD resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels at a frame rate of 30 fps. A more thorough examination reveals decent photo quality and the rear-facing camera is capable of taking nice pics as long as the environment is bright enough. Sharpness and details are quite OK considering the price, but the colors could be a little bit more saturated. In low light conditions, the camera and the corresponding software struggle more and the graininess is high. The front-facing unit - oftentimes called a "selfie" camera - does exactly what it was designed for and is suitable Skype conferencing or snapping smaller selfies. The focal length is fixed, but most comparable products are no different.

Image Comparison

Choose a scene and navigate within the first image. One click changes the zoom step. One click on the zoomed-in image opens the original in a new window. The first image shows the scaled photograph of the test device.

Scene 1Scene 2Scene 3

Accessories

Pretty standard as well is the lack of accessories - only a power adapter is included. Dedicated accessories are sparse as well: the homepage only lists a leather-like cover. The cover is available in white, brown and black and sells for around 25 Euro (~$27).

Warranty

In Germany, the tablet is covered against defects for two years, although the battery is exempt and only protected for 12 months. Accessories are only guaranteed for 6 months.

Input & Operation

The capacitive touchscreen accepts inputs without a hitch and the glass surface accepts up to five fingers simultaneously. Other units - for example the Lenovo TAB 2 A10 - are able to recognize up to ten fingers though.

Samsung has their own virtual keyboard, which supports automatic text recognition or swyping. The user can also reduce the size of the keyboard and move it around on the screen. In landscape mode, typing is not a problem, although we never used more than two or three fingers per hand. After practicing for a while, we were able too type at about half the speed we achieve when using a regular keyboard and the 10-finger method. 

Keyboard in portrait mode
Keyboard in portrait mode
The display recognizes 5 out of 10 fingers
The display recognizes 5 out of 10 fingers
Keyboard in landscape mode
Keyboard in landscape mode

Display

Samsung's new entry-level tablet features a 9.6-inch display with a resolution of 1280 x 800 pixels. Because of the low resolution and the corresponding pixel density of 157 ppi, individual pixels are identifiable with the naked eye. The Lenovo TAB 2 does it better, as its 10-inch display supports a resolution of 1920 x 1200 Pixel at 224 ppi. Even though the resolution isn't that great, the average brightness is very acceptable at 452 cd/m². The glossy panel can thus overpower some reflections in really bright environments. The tablet maintains the maximum brightness even when not plugged in, which is of course very important.

Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
Mali-400 MP, SC8830, 8 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
Mali-T760 MP2, MT8165, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
Mali-450 MP4, MT8127, 16 GB SSD
Medion Lifetab S10345
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB SSD
Screen
30%
-7%
-14%
Brightness453335
-26%
339
-25%
281
-38%
Brightness Distribution8788
1%
90
3%
88
1%
Black Level *0.490.191
61%
0.42
14%
0.5
-2%
Contrast9331848
98%
848
-9%
588
-37%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *5.754.31
25%
6.51
-13%
5.78
-1%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *5.334.36
18%
5.92
-11%
5.61
-5%
Gamma *2.612.332.212.67
CCT6820 95%7045 92%6736 96%7439 87%

* ... smaller is better

478
cd/m²
440
cd/m²
459
cd/m²
493
cd/m²
457
cd/m²
433
cd/m²
456
cd/m²
429
cd/m²
429
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 493 cd/m² Average: 452.7 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 87 %
Center on Battery: 457 cd/m²
Contrast: 933:1 (Black: 0.49 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 5.75 | - Ø
ΔE Greyscale 5.33 | - Ø
Gamma: 2.61

At maximum brightness, black doesn't look very saturated. Our measurements confirm a black value of 0.49 cd/m². Once again, the Lenovo Tab 10 pulls ahead with a black value of 0.191 cd/m². The brightness of the Tab 10 is 100 cd/m² lower, though.

Our CalMan analysis shows DeltaE-deviations of between 5 and 6 for both colors and grayscale - an about average result for an IPS panel. The competitors aren't much better, but the expensive Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 has DeltaE-deviations of around one. The color temperature of 6820 K is not that far from the ideal of 6500K and can still be considered pretty "warm".

CalMAN ColorChecker
CalMAN ColorChecker
CalMAN Grayscale
CalMAN Grayscale
CalMAN SaturationSweeps
CalMAN SaturationSweeps
CalMAN Colorspace
CalMAN Colorspace

Of course tablets are suited well for mobile use, so we are very interested how the Tab E handles the outdoors. Even though the panel is glossy, working is possible even in bright environments. We do recommend staying away from direct sunlight, as it can overwhelm the display.

Das Galaxy Tab E ...
Das Galaxy Tab E ...
... outdoors ...
... outdoors ...
... during cloudy winter conditions.
... during cloudy winter conditions.

The IPS panel offers excellent viewing angle stability and remains visible even at quite shallow angles. Only at very extreme angles we started noticing a color cast.

Blickwinkelstabilität
Blickwinkelstabilität

Performance

Clock speed during the PCMark benchmark
Clock speed during the PCMark benchmark
A closer look at the frequencies
A closer look at the frequencies

The 9.6-inch tablet comes with a  Spreadtrum SC7730SE. The quad-core (ARM Cortex-A7) CPU runs at up to 1300 MHz, but can drop to around 770 MHz if the demand is low or to support energy-saving measures. The ARM Cortex-A7 was released four years ago, so from a performance standpoint the CPU is pretty entry-level. Graphics are handled by an ARM Mali 400 MP4, which is only found in smartphones these days. The Mali 450 is more widely used in this price bracket. Consequently, our review slate does worse than the competitors in pretty much all benchmark tests and only be compared to older tablets from 2014. For that reason, we've included smartphones with the same GPU and older tablets like the Medion Lifetab S10334Test Medion Lifetab S10334 Tablet in our comparison table.

An examination of the clock speed during the 3DMark and PCMark benchmark tests also explains the bad results, since the CPU can barely ever run at the nominal speed. At times, we observed dips to under 400 MHz.

Transfer speed of the integrated flash storage
Transfer speed of the integrated flash storage
Geekbench 3
32 Bit Multi-Core Score (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
1091 Points ∼7%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
2031 Points ∼12% +86%
HP Pavilion 10-k000ng x2
1941 Points ∼12% +78%
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 1050F
2426 Points ∼15% +122%
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
1179 Points ∼7% +8%
Medion Lifetab S10345
2018 Points ∼12% +85%
Medion Lifetab S10334
1493 Points ∼9% +37%
LG Bello II
891 Points ∼5% -18%
32 Bit Single-Core Score (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
346 Points ∼7%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
686 Points ∼15% +98%
HP Pavilion 10-k000ng x2
729 Points ∼16% +111%
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 1050F
764 Points ∼16% +121%
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
361 Points ∼8% +4%
Medion Lifetab S10345
801 Points ∼17% +132%
Medion Lifetab S10334
516 Points ∼11% +49%
LG Bello II
361 Points ∼8% +4%
3DMark (2013) - 1280x720 Ice Storm Standard Score (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
3323 Points ∼2%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
10061 Points ∼5% +203%
HP Pavilion 10-k000ng x2
14467 Points ∼7% +335%
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
5030 Points ∼3% +51%
Medion Lifetab S10345
9497 Points ∼5% +186%
Medion Lifetab S10334
2773 Points ∼1% -17%
LG Bello II
2880 Points ∼1% -13%
Doogee Nova Y100X
2849 Points ∼1% -14%
PCMark for Android - Work performance score (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
2361 Points ∼29%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
4226 Points ∼52% +79%
Doogee Nova Y100X
2786 Points ∼34% +18%
Smartbench 2012
Gaming Index (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
1932 points ∼42%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
3843 points ∼84% +99%
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 1050F
2781 points ∼60% +44%
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
3047 points ∼66% +58%
Medion Lifetab S10345
3166 points ∼69% +64%
LG Bello II
3170 points ∼69% +64%
Doogee Nova Y100X
2252 points ∼49% +17%
Productivity Index (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
4156 points ∼22%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
7277 points ∼39% +75%
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 1050F
9045 points ∼48% +118%
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
4601 points ∼24% +11%
Medion Lifetab S10345
8035 points ∼43% +93%
LG Bello II
2913 points ∼15% -30%
Doogee Nova Y100X
3769 points ∼20% -9%
BaseMark OS II - Overall (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
354 Points ∼11%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
929 Points ∼28% +162%
LG Bello II
437 Points ∼13% +23%
Doogee Nova Y100X
374 Points ∼11% +6%

Legend

 
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi) Spreadtrum SC8830, ARM Mali-400 MP, 8 GB eMMC Flash
 
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70 Mediatek MT8165, ARM Mali-T760 MP2, 16 GB eMMC Flash
 
HP Pavilion 10-k000ng x2 Intel Atom Z3736F, Intel HD Graphics (Bay Trail), 32 GB eMMC Flash
 
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 1050F Intel Atom Z3745, Intel HD Graphics (Bay Trail), 16 GB eMMC Flash
 
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003) Mediatek MT8127, ARM Mali-450 MP4, 16 GB SSD
 
Medion Lifetab S10345 Intel Atom Z3735F, Intel HD Graphics (Bay Trail), 32 GB SSD
 
Medion Lifetab S10334 Rockchip RK3188, ARM Mali-400 MP4, 16 GB eMMC Flash
 
LG Bello II Mediatek MT6582, ARM Mali-400 MP2, 8 GB eMMC Flash
 
Doogee Nova Y100X Mediatek MT6582, ARM Mali-400 MP, 8 GB eMMC Flash

Gaming

The less-than-stellar performance doesn't impact gaming too much. Older and casual titles don't pose much of a problem for the new Samsung slate. Angry Birds runs without any stutters, for example. Demanding games like Asphalt 8 are a different story and the frame rate is too low. Gameplay is possible only at the lowest settings, but we still encountered some lag and stutters regardless.

Angry Birds is playable without issues.
Angry Birds is playable without issues.
Demanding games are a different story.
Demanding games are a different story.

Emissions & Energy

Temperature

The back panel
The back panel

As far as the temperatures are concerned, we can only find positive things to say. Neither idle nor load are an issue. The hotspot - located on the display - only reaches 34 °C. The power adapter doesn't get hot, either: we measured 35.7 °C during idle and 38.4 °C under load. The thinner and more powerful Samsung Galaxy S2 reaches up to 41 °C. Other competitors in the same price bracket are quite comparable.

Before we move on, we also want to take a look at the clock speeds. Here, we task the Galaxy Tab E with the tool "Stability Test". Even though we observed low frequencies during the benchmarks, this test reveals a constant clock speed. This could potentially be due to a refresh-error of the software. In the beginning, the graphics simulation is quite fluent, but the frame rates drop as time progresses. 

Max. Load
 28.8 °C27.5 °C32.6 °C 
 33.5 °C28.5 °C34.1 °C 
 32.8 °C27.7 °C32.6 °C 
Maximum: 34.1 °C
Average: 30.9 °C
30.6 °C28.6 °C29.6 °C
32.4 °C29.2 °C34.7 °C
31.7 °C29.6 °C33.4 °C
Maximum: 34.7 °C
Average: 31.1 °C
Power Supply (max.)  38.4 °C | Room Temperature 21.5 °C | Voltcraft IR-350
Discussion

Speaker

Considering the size and the mobility factor, the tablet's speaker is actually quite decent and the quality sufficient for watching a few series or YouTube videos. Maximum volume is fairly loud and voices can be understood easily. Bass and a decent sound stage require the use of external speakers or headphones, however.

Power consumption

During idle, the test tablet never consumed more than about 4 W. Even under load, the maximum remained quite low at 6.2 W. More potent tablets in this size require up to 50 % more power. During standby, the tablet consumes only 0.1 W. When the Tab E is turned off, the power meter indicated zero drain.

Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
Mali-400 MP, SC8830, 8 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
Mali-450 MP4, MT8127, 16 GB SSD
Medion Lifetab S10345
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB SSD
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 1050F
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3745, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Power Consumption
-31%
39%
-16%
Idle Minimum *1.12.1
-91%
0.8
27%
1.5
-36%
Idle Average *3.94.7
-21%
1.1
72%
3.7
5%
Idle Maximum *4.14.9
-20%
1.4
66%
4.1
-0%
Load Average *5.26.2
-19%
4.5
13%
6.7
-29%
Load Maximum *6.26.4
-3%
5.3
15%
7.5
-21%

* ... smaller is better

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0 / 0.1 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 1.1 / 3.9 / 4.1 Watt
Load midlight 5.2 / 6.2 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Voltcraft VC 940

Battery Life

The review tablet houses a lithium-ion battery with a capacity of 5000 mAh - an astounding 2200 mAh less than the Lenovo TAB 2 and 2700 mAh less than the Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3. Samsung claims run times of up to 8 hours while surfing the web - a claim we are going to take a closer look at.

First we check the minimum run time by turning the display to the maximum brightness and running the tool "Stability Test". The tablet shut down after about 4.5 hours. The Lenovo Tab 2 A10 lasted a little over seven hours; the Acer Iconia Tab also bested the Tab E by 30 min.

The most important test simulates web browsing. At an average brightness, the tablet managed about 8.5 hours; the competition lasts about as long. An outlier is the Lenovo Yoga 2, which surprised us with its 12.5 hours.

Last but not least we also take a look at the maximum possible battery life. With the brightness turned all the way down, the Tab E ran a script simulating reading for a little over 14 hours.

Battery Runtime - WiFi Websurfing 1.3 (sort by value)
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
Mali-400 MP, SC8830, 8 GB eMMC Flash
518 min ∼43%
Lenovo TAB2 A10-70
Mali-T760 MP2, MT8165, 16 GB eMMC Flash
515 min ∼43% -1%
Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi)
Mali-400 MP, SC8830, 8 GB eMMC Flash
Medion Lifetab S10345
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB SSD
Acer Iconia Tab 10 A3-A20 (NT.L5DEE.003)
Mali-450 MP4, MT8127, 16 GB SSD
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 8
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3745, 32 GB eMMC Flash
HP Pavilion 10-k000ng x2
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3736F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Battery Runtime
5%
4%
-2%
-10%
Reader / Idle850892
5%
768
-10%
829
-2%
755
-11%
Load264278
5%
308
17%
244
-8%
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
14h 10min
WiFi Surfing v1.3
8h 38min
Big Buck Bunny H.264 1080p
8h 22min
Load (maximum brightness)
4h 24min

Pro

+ inexpensive
+ good build quality
+ loud speaker
+ doesn't get hot

Cons

- all-plastic design
- one USB port
- performance not up to par
- only 8 GB of storage

Verdict

In review: Samsung Galaxy Tab E. Test courtesy of notebooksbilliger.de
In review: Samsung Galaxy Tab E. Test courtesy of notebooksbilliger.de

Samsung's Galaxy Tab E is an well-executed entry into the world of tablets. The review slate is solid and features all required communication modules as well as two cameras. The build quality is without flaw and the size is a good compromise. The IPS display is very bright and better than what's usually offered. The main drawback is the performance: the hardware could be a little more powerful since throttling occurs already at the beginning of benchmark tests. Users who want a tablet for web browsing and occasional gameplay won't really notice, however. We also like the low temperatures and the loud speaker.

The Samsung Tab E is a well-rounded tablet which - at a price of 180 Euro ($200) - leaves us with an overall favorable impression.

The Galaxy Tab E doesn't quite rule the low-price segment, but it is definitely a worthy choice. We do recommend looking at the competitors Lenovo Tab 2 or Lenovo Yoga 2 as well.

Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6, Wi-Fi) - 01/05/2016 v4.1(old)
Nino Ricchizzi

Chassis
80%
Keyboard
77 / 80 → 96%
Pointing Device
89%
Connectivity
40 / 66 → 61%
Weight
83 / 88 → 90%
Battery
91%
Display
83%
Games Performance
53 / 68 → 78%
Application Performance
22 / 76 → 29%
Temperature
91%
Noise
100%
Audio
53 / 91 → 58%
Camera
61 / 85 → 72%
Average
71%
83%
Tablet - Weighted Average

Pricecompare

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Samsung Galaxy Tab E (9.6-inch, WiFi) T560N Tablet Review
Nino Ricchizzi, 2016-01-16 (Update: 2016-01-16)