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IFA 2011 | Samsung removes all traces of Galaxy Tab 7.7 from IFA

Samsung removes all traces of Galaxy Tab 7.7 from IFA
Samsung removes all traces of Galaxy Tab 7.7 from IFA
The recently announced Galaxy Tab 7.7 has exited the IFA without much of an explanation

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The brand new Galaxy Tab 7.7 has inconspicuously left the IFA party early.

Announced just a few days ago, the Android tablet has now been pulled out of the expo by Samsung, including all demo units and references. Even Samsung’s own German website has apparently been updated to remove all ads and previews of the device.

Exactly why Samsung decided to take down the displays is not yet clear, but it is likely due to the ongoing legal feuds between the South Korean manufacturer and Apple. The Galaxy Tab 10.1 is still banned in certain regions and the Galaxy Tab 7.7 doesn’t sway too far from its older sibling in terms of design. With that said, Samsung may have been requested to close the curtains on the new Galaxy Tab or could just be playing it safe. The German ban on the Galaxy Tab 10.1 is currently scheduled to last at least until September 9th.

The dual-core 1.4GHz Galaxy Tab 7.7 will have a 7.7-inch 1280x800 resolution Super AMOLED Plus screen, 64GB SSD and run Android Honeycomb 3.2. Samsung is still holding back expected release dates for the new tablet.

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Allen Ngo, 2011-09- 4 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.