Notebookcheck

Samsung Series 9 (NT900X3B) now available in Korea

Samsung Series 9 (NT900X3B) now available in Korea
Samsung Series 9 (NT900X3B) now available in Korea
The super-thin Series 9 gets even thinner and lighter, but still not quite at Ultrabook prices just yet

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a loyal reader of notebookcheck? Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team!

Especially wanted: 
Review Editor - 
Details here
News Editor - Details here

 

 

 

 

Samsung’s update to its original and highly regarded Series 9 notebook is finally on sale, at least in its native land.

The 13.3-inch ultrathin notebook is even more impressive than the first generation Series 9 with a 1600x900 resolution 400 nit display, Core i7-2637M CPU, 4GB RAM and a 256GB SSD. The unibody aluminum design is only 12.9mm (0.508 inches) thick and 1.16kg (2.56 pounds). For comparison, the 13.3-inch 2011 MacBook Air is 17mm (0.669 inches) thick and 1.34kg (2.96 pounds).

Fortunately, the ultrathin profile hasn’t excluded too many physical connectivity options. The unit includes a USB 2.0 port, USB 3.0 port, micro HDMI, 4-in-1 card slot and miniaturized LAN and VGA-out ports.

As a premier Samsung notebook, the Series 9 has never been particularly easy on the wallet. The NT900X3B begins at $2376 USD in Korea, but fortunately, the base model is expected to sell for about $1400 once it arrives in the U.S according to Laptoping. The 15-inch Samsung Series 9, however, still remains under curtains.

Definitely check back for our review of the second generation Series 9 post U.S. launch. In the meantime, see here for our in-depth review of the original 13.3-inch Series 9 (900X3A).

Source(s)

Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2012 02 > Samsung Series 9 (NT900X3B) now available in Korea
Allen Ngo, 2012-02-18 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.