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Intel ships Core i7-2637M, 2677M and Core i5-2557M ULV CPUs

Intel ships Core i5-2557M, Core i7-2637M and Core i7-2677M ULV CPUs
Intel ships Core i5-2557M, Core i7-2637M and Core i7-2677M ULV CPUs
The 17 TDP, 32nm CPUs are now shipping to manufacturers for implementation in ultrathin laptops

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The latest Sandy Bridge Ultralow voltage chipsets should be available to manufacturers this month. This includes the Core i5-2557M, Core i7-2637M and Core i7-2677M processors.

The trio of processors was leaked last month and was right on the spot with regards to speeds, TDP, number of threads and graphics power. Check out the previous news article here for more details on the specifications of each.

Since these 32nm ULV CPUs are designed for ultrathin laptops, there are heavy expectations that the 2011 MacBook Air refresh would include these new Sandy Bridge processors. Compared to the currently outdated 1.4GHz SU9400 and 1.6GHz SU9600 Core 2 Duo processors in the current MBA lineup, the ULV Sandy Bridge chips would be much needed upgrades to the ultrathin notebooks.

The upcoming Asus UX21 will reportedly be using one of the new Sandy Bridge ULV CPUs when it ships this September.

According to the official Intel price list [PDF], the Core i5-2557M, Core i7-2637M and Core i7-2677M began shipment on June 19th for $250, $289 and $317, respectively.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2011 06 > Intel ships Core i7-2637M, 2677M and Core i5-2557M ULV CPUs
Allen Ngo, 2011-06-21 (Update: 2012-05-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.