Notebookcheck

Huawei P10 smartphone specifications leak

Huawei P10 smartphone specifications leak
Huawei P10 smartphone specifications leak
Huawei only recently introduced the Mate 9, but the Chinese manufacturer may already be gearing up to unveil the P9 successor.

The popular Huawei P9 will indubitably get its successor by 2017. Now, a leaked benchmark from GFXBench may have dropped some clues on what users can expect from the next Huawei flagship.

Listed as LON-L29 on GFXBench, this mystery Huawei phone is likely the direct successor to the Huawei P9 as the P9 has a very similar LON-L19 model name. The P10 is expected to carry Huawei's high-end SoC and this is indeed what the leaked specifications show with the 2.3 GHz Kirin 960. This same SoC powers the Mate 9 as well.

Other core features include Android 7.0 Nougat, 6 GB of RAM, and 256 GB of internal storage. Display resolution should be QHD (2560 x 1440) on a 5.5-inch screen size compared to the 5.9-inch FHD panel on the existing Mate 9. Rear and front cameras are listed as 12 MP and 8 MP, respectively, with the rear camera being capable of 4K recording. It remains to be seen if the P10 will incorporate dual rear cameras or if multiple SKUs with differing RAM and storage capacities are planned.

The current Huawei P9 launched to excellent reviews and the Chinese manufacturer is rising quickly in worldwide recognition and smartphone shipments.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 11 > Huawei P10 smartphone specifications leak
Allen Ngo, 2016-11-13 (Update: 2016-11-14)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.