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Google Android 6.0 Marshmallow now running on 7.5 percent of active Android devices

Google Android 6.0 Marshmallow now on 7.5 percent of active Android devices
Google Android 6.0 Marshmallow now on 7.5 percent of active Android devices
Devices running Android 6.0 Marshmallow are up significantly from 4.6 percent just a month ago to 7.5 percent as of early May.

The market share of Google's latest Android version is finally growing at a steady pace. After being available for over a year, the latest numbers from Google Dashboard are reporting that 7.5 percent of active Android smartphones are now running Android 6.0 Marshmallow compared to 4.6 percent in March and April. This also marks the first time that Marshmallow surpassed Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, which is now running on just 7.2 percent of all Android devices. Google's definition of an "active" Android device is one that has accessed the Play Store within a 7-day period.

Other than Marshmallow and Jelly Bean, most other versions are still prevalent. Android 5.0 and 5.1 Lollipop are still running on 16.2 percent and 19.4 percent of Android devices, respectively, and together make up the majority at 35.6 percent. This is down 0.2 percent compared to the beginning of April. Android 4.4 KitKat also saw a slight decline from 33.4 percent to 32.5 percent in the same time frame.

Older Android versions like 4.1.x to 4.3 Jelly Bean now make up 20.1 percent compared to 21.3 percent in April while Android 4.0.3 to 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich is now only on 2 percent of devices. Android 2.3.3 to 2.3.7 Gingerbread and Android 2.2 Froyo are on 2.2 percent and 0.1 percent, respectively.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Google Android 6.0 Marshmallow now running on 7.5 percent of active Android devices
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05- 9 (Update: 2016-05- 9)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.