Review HTC One X+ Smartphone

Michael Moser (translated by Ariana Brodsky), 02/16/2013

Facelift. HTC re-engineered their One X, packing their current top model, the One X+, with a few more horsepower and a bigger tank under the hood. But those aren't the only renovations. A run on our rugged test track shows what else is inside and how the revisions have altered the device.

For the original German review, see here.

"What Apple can do, we've already been doing a long time." They must have been thinking that at HTC -- thus the Taiwanese engineers have reworked their Android-based top model One X and promise 27 percent greater performance. From the outside the changes are barely noticeable -- it's on the inside that HTC put their hand to the plow. If you're looking for all the good and expensive technological innards on the market, you'll find many of them in the HTC One X+. Just LTE seems to have been saved for a later update or the new Android Flagship One X5 project.

The One X+ tickles a 1.7 GHz clock frequency out of its Nvidia Tegra 3+ processor. The storage space has also grown to a full 64 GB, and the battery has expanded to a capacity of 2100 mAh. The webcam's resolution has been raised to 1.6 megapixels. Much of what you'll find in the new HTC Smartphone is already familiar from the One X: 1 GB memory, an 8 MP main camera, and an HD SuperLCD touchscreen with a resolution of 1280x720 pixels and a 4.7-inch diagonal measurement. Evolution rather than revolution seems to be the motto. Has the gentle remodeling given the new model enough umph to climb the rungs to the heights of the smartphone heavens?

Case

Here HTC held back - wisely, we think. The case of the One X was almost optimal to begin with: stable, impeccably manufactured, anti-skid coated, with Gorilla Glass to protect the panel - there's not all that much room for improvement. The changes they did make are subtle: the skeleton is a little darker than that of the predecessor model, and it has colorful highlights consisting of a red camera border, a red BeatsAudio logo and sensor keys of the same color.

Otherwise the cases of the One X+ and the One X are exactly alike, which is why we encourage you to look at our extensive review of the HTC One X for further details.

The HTC One X+ carried over the consistent design, the good feel and high stability...
The HTC One X+ carried over the consistent design, the good feel and high stability...
...1:1 from its predecessor, the HTC One X.
...1:1 from its predecessor, the HTC One X.

Connectivity

One of the most important upgrades from the HTC One X to our test device is the stronger Nvidia Tegra AP37 processor. The clock rate increased from 1.5 to 1.7 GHz and the working memory of 1 GB remains as it is in the SoC (System-on-a-Chip) integrated into the Nvidia GeForce graphics card.

In regards to connections and their positions, nothing has changed since the HTC One X: There's the obligatory 3.5 mm jack and a micro USB 2.0 port -- the HTC One X+ doesn't offer anything more. For more information we once again invite you to turn to our review of the HTC One X.

top side: power button, 3.5 mm jack, microphone
top side: power button, 3.5 mm jack, microphone
left side: micro USB 2.0
left side: micro USB 2.0
bottom edge: microphone
bottom edge: microphone
right side: volume control
right side: volume control

Software

The HTC One X+ is run on Google's current operating system, Android 4.1.1 (Jelly Bean). HTC superimposes their own optically-polished user interface, called HTC Sense UI in the current version. There's nothing groundbreaking here that the predecessor One X doesn't already offer. But there's something interesting in the possibility of using your own PC or Mac to comfortably set up the smartphone upon its first start-up via the browser-based user interface HTC Sense.com. Data backup is also possible here.

Directly compared with the iPhone 5 in browser-mode, it's clear that the smaller iPhone 5 offers a considerably stronger zoom. On the other hand, the 4.7-inch display on the HTC One X+ offers a pleasant overall view and is excellent for surfing.

Both smartphones have quick browsers...
Both smartphones have quick browsers...
...but the iPhone 5 has a higher zoom level.
...but the iPhone 5 has a higher zoom level.
With its large display the HTC One X+ is ideal for surfing.
With its large display the HTC One X+ is ideal for surfing.

Communication & GPS

The HTC One X has at its command -- like the One X -- WLAN 802.11a/b/g/nBluetooth 4.0 including aptX audio codec and the usual GSM and UMTS frequencies. LTE isn't supported. During testing the radio modules proved to be on the same level as those in the iPhone 5. In a big apartment with 2 walls and about 10 meters (~33 feet) between the device and the router, the transmission over WLAN was noticeably slow over both devices -- though at no point were there any interruptions in the connections. In the vicinity of the router, however, downloads went very quickly.

We also tested the reception strength of the GPS module with the "GPS test" App. The HTC One X+'s GPS module with GLONASS proved to operate quickly and accurately. The first satellites were found within seconds. Of course the device found fewer satellites inside buildings than out in the fresh air; but the respectable precision even in enclosed spaces was impressive.

HTC also treats their new Android Flagship to an NFC chip (Near Field Communication) for wireless connections with compatible terminals. Theoretically that enables the device to be used for payment functions or as a digital key substitute. However, such scenarios for possible use are not yet widely offered in Germany.

Telephone Function

The telephone app is no different from that of other Android smartphones, and thanks to the intuitive operation and clear interface there's nothing puzzling about it. Contacts already listed in the user's own Google account are automatically transferred to the phone during the first set-up.

GPS test outside
GPS test outside
GPS test inside
GPS test inside
Telephone function
Telephone function

Cameras & Multimedia

Main camera: 8 MP
Main camera: 8 MP
Front camera: 1.6 MP
Front camera: 1.6 MP

Like its predecessor, the HTC One X+ shoots photos with two camera modules. The main camera, located on the back side of the device, is the same as before and has the same resolution of 8 megapixels (a maximum of 3264x1840 pixels in 16:9 format, 3264x2448 pixels in 4:3). A BSI sensor and a 28 mm lens (aperture fixed at f2.0) work together with an LED flash. You can record videos in full HD resolution with 30 fps. While taking a video you can also shoot photos in parallel at a resolution of 6 megapixels. For an exact description of the photo and video functions we refer you again to our review of the HTC One X.

Turning our attention to the front camera: where the HTC One X only offered 1.3 megapixels, the One X+ now offers a resolution of 1.6 megapixels (1456x828 pixels at 16:9, 1456x1088 pixels at 4:3). Videos can be shot at a resolution of 1280x720 pixels. Depending on the light environment the picture quality is quite acceptable; only in poor lighting situations does a relatively high level of image noise appear. The colors are represented with a very slight red cast due to low color temperature.

Main camera
Main camera
Main camera with LED flash
Main camera with LED flash
Front camera
Front camera
Reference camera Nikon D3100
Reference camera Nikon D3100

Accessories

In simple and environmentally friendly packaging, as is typical for HTC, alongside the smartphone the manufacturer delivers the usual accessories. There's a compact power supply with a USB connector and a matching USB-to-MicroUSB cable. The latter doubles as a data cable to form a connection with a PC or Mac. In addition to a few short manuals, there's also a tool for opening the SIM card slide. Despite the relevant device license, the included stereo headset isn't from the accessory manufacturer BeatsAudio.

The docking station CR S650, designed for the HTC One X and available for about 60 Euros (~$81), is also compatible with the One X+. Several other accessories also remain compatible with the new device.

Warranty

The warranty from the manufacturer is good for 24 months, the accessories for 12 months. HTC doesn't offer any optional warranty extensions, but many vendors or mobile phone service providers step into the breach.

Input Devices and Operation

In terms of operation, in comparison with the HTC One X nothing has changed: The HTC One X+'s capacitive touchscreen still serves as the main input. Taps and wiping movements with fingers are quickly and precisely translated. Multi-touch gestures like, for example, pinch-to-zoom (zooming with two fingers) function just as flawlessly. For text input the HTC One X+ uses the display keyboard common to Android devices.

The touch keys beneath the display also do their job reliably. The volume control rocker on the right side of the case travels a very short distance, but you can clearly feel the click point. The power button on the top side of the smartphone, however, is a little difficult to use, due to its unclear click point.

The bottom line is that the same positive and negative points apply to the operational controls on the One X+ as applied to the One X before it. More specific information on the subject can be found in the predecessor's review.

Touchscreen
Touchscreen
Keyboard upright
Keyboard upright
Keyboard sideways
Keyboard sideways

Display

4.7-inch SLCD2 IP display with 1.280 x 800 pixels and 312.5 PPI.
4.7-inch SLCD2 IP display with 1.280 x 800 pixels and 312.5 PPI.

The HTC One X+ uses an SLCD2 4.7-inch display with an IPS panel with a resolution of 720p (1280x720 pixels). A plate made of Corning Gorilla Glass 2 covering the display offers strong enough protection against scratches and is very pressure-resistant. The pure numbers are exactly the same as those of its predecessor, the HTC One X. But if you compare the measured values, a difference of about 14 percent can probably be attributed to some slight variability across individual devices. The One X's test sample glowed with an average of 448.4 cd/m², whereas our test device HTC One X+ now reached an average value of 386.9 cd/m². In this category, with an average luminosity of 486.8 cd/m² and 326 PPI, the iPhone 5 did about 21 percent better. The One X+'s pixel density totaled 312.5 PPI (HTC One X: 312 PPI). The HTC One X+'s luminosity peak-value climbed to a very good 412 cd/m² (One X: 464 cd/m², iPhone 5: 499 cd/m²). With only 148.6 cd/m² (peak: 153 cd/m², 306 PPI), the Samsung Galaxy S3 can't keep up, but conversely it does possess fantastic contrast and black levels.

377
cd/m²
390
cd/m²
412
cd/m²
378
cd/m²
392
cd/m²
398
cd/m²
374
cd/m²
380
cd/m²
381
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
Information
Gossen Mavo-Monitor
Maximum: 412 cd/m²
Average: 386.9 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 91 %
Center on Battery: 392 cd/m²
Black: 0.45 cd/m²
Contrast: 871:1

In accordance with the brightness variability, both the black and contrast levels of the review device lie at 0.45 cd/m² and 871:1, respectively, lower than those of its predecessor and the competition (HTC One X: 0.36 cd/m², 1225:1; Samsung Galaxy S3: 0.03 cd/m², 4900:1; iPhone 5: 0.48 cd/m², 1040:1), though with these values the device is still playing in the upper league in terms of product quality. Subjectively, the brilliant colors, the high contrast and the crisp images are enough to make a user enthusiastic. In addition, the HTC One X+ contains an obligatory ambient brightness sensor that can be configured in the system settings.

The HTC One X+ scores when it comes to outdoor use. The high luminosity and good contrast generate a great picture even out in the fresh air, though due to the design of the device the display's glass surface is very reflective. A matte protective film could be a low-cost remedy here.

The IPS panel offers almost absolute viewing-angle stability. Color inversion and loss of luminosity only occur at viewing-angles irrelevant for practical use (starting at around 180 degrees). A look at our reference image substantiates this impressively.

Viewing-angle HTC One X+
Viewing-angle HTC One X+

Performance

Android benchmarks

The new Nvidia Tegra 3+ AP37 SoC (System-on-a-Chip) built into the HTC One X+ is manufactured in a 40 nanometer structure width and clocks, in comparison to the familiar four-core Tegra 3 AP33 (for instance in the HTC One X), at a maximum of 1.7 GHz rather than 1.5 GHz (1.7 GHz single-core, quad-core: 1.5 GHz). According to HTC this should increase the performance by 27 percent. The integrated Nvidia GeForce ULP graphics card as well as the 1 GB LPDDR2 working memory with 1.066 MHz, however, are old friends from the HTC One X.

We compared the performance with several Android benchmarks in order to verify the advertised jump in performance. Firstly we took a look at browser-based benchmarks. Here the HTC One X+ was head-to-head with the competition. In the Peacekeeper test, for instance, the HTC One X+ lies on the same level as the Samsung Galaxy S3 and is beat out by the Apple iPhone 5 by a margin of 30 percent. The Sunspider 0.9.1 paints a somewhat different picture: The Galaxy S3 and the One X lie a considerable stretch behind, and the HTC One X+ dashes quite near to the quick iPhone 5 in this benchmark. In Google V8, with 2136 points our test device overtakes the HTC One X and the iPhone 5 by 30 percent, though the Samsung Galaxy S3 only lies shortly behind. But then in Browsermark 2.0 the One X+ comes in behind the iPhone 5 and the Samsung Galaxy S3 by 38 and 10 percent, respectively.

Google V8 Ver. 7 - Google V8 Ver. 7 Score
HTC One X+
2136 Points ∼12%
Apple iPhone 5
1457 Points ∼8% -32%
Samsung Galaxy S3
1978 Points ∼11% -7%
HTC One X
1385 Points ∼8% -35%
Sunspider
HTC One X+
1028.2 ms * ∼10%
Apple iPhone 5
935.4 ms * ∼9% +9%
Samsung Galaxy S3
1477.8 ms * ∼14% -44%
HTC One X
1696.1 ms * ∼16% -65%
Mozilla Kraken 1.0 - Total Score
HTC One X+
18124.1 ms * ∼11%
Apple iPhone 5
20380.2 ms * ∼12% -12%
Samsung Galaxy S3
15411.3 ms * ∼9% +15%
Peacekeeper
HTC One X+
667 Points ∼11%
Apple iPhone 5
863 Points ∼14% +29%
Samsung Galaxy S3
664 Points ∼11% 0%
Browsermark
HTC One X+
1723 points ∼24%
Apple iPhone 5
2383 points ∼33% +38%
Samsung Galaxy S3
1898 points ∼26% +10%
Legend
      HTC One X+ NVIDIA Tegra 3, NVIDIA GeForce ULP (Tegra 3), 64 GB SSD
      Apple iPhone 5 Apple A6, PowerVR SGX543MP3, 32 GB SSD
      Samsung Galaxy S3 Samsung Exynos 4412 Quad, ARM Mali-400 MP4, 16 GB SSD
      HTC One X NVIDIA Tegra 3, NVIDIA GeForce ULP (Tegra 3), 32 GB SSD

* ... smaller is better

In Linpack's multithread calculation the One X+ can claim second place behind the undefeated iPhone 5. The Smartbench 2012 benchmark is also favorable towards the test device, though the results are distinctly closer to each other. In the GPU benchmarks, directly compared with its predecessor the One X, the One X+ is the clear winner almost without exception. Only in Basemark ES 2.0 does the One X+ come in rather far behind. In comparison with the rest of the competition our picture is somewhat mixed: In the GLBenchmark 2.5 the One X+ and the Galaxy S3 are on the same display level, the iPhone 5 trumps both with a doubled frame rate of 22 FPS. In the NenaMark 2 benchmark, for example, with 58.8 FPS the Samsung Galaxy S3 does 4 percent better than the One X+. So the promised increase in performance doesn't prove to be consistent.

AnTuTu Benchmark v3 - Total Score
HTC One X+
16276 Points ∼45%
Samsung Galaxy S3
15395 Points ∼43% -5%
Antutu 3DRating
HTC One X+
3377 Points ∼30%
Samsung Galaxy S3
3269 Points ∼29% -3%
Apple iPhone 5
11353 Points ∼100% +236%
1024x2048 Off-screen
HTC One X+
1335 Points ∼46%
Samsung Galaxy S3
2038 Points ∼71% +53%
Apple iPhone 5
1373 Points ∼48% +3%
GLBenchmark 2.5 - 1920x1080 Egypt HD Offscreen Fixed Time
HTC One X+
11 fps ∼2%
Samsung Galaxy S3
11 fps ∼2% 0%
Apple iPhone 5
22 fps ∼4% +100%
Linpack for Android - Multi Thread
HTC One X+
166.667 MFLOPS ∼15%
Samsung Galaxy S3
137 MFLOPS ∼13% -18%
Apple iPhone 5
574.95 MFLOPS ∼52% +245%
HTC One X
143.914 MFLOPS ∼13% -14%
Smartbench 2012 - Productivity Index
HTC One X+
4907 points ∼47%
Samsung Galaxy S3
4116 points ∼40% -16%
HTC One X
4679 points ∼45% -5%
NenaMark2
HTC One X+
56.5 fps ∼84%
Samsung Galaxy S3
58.8 fps ∼87% +4%
HTC One X
47.5 fps ∼71% -16%
Basemark ES 2.0 - Taiji Free
HTC One X+
15.53 fps ∼26%
Samsung Galaxy S3
37.1 fps ∼61% +139%
HTC One X
18.37 fps ∼30% +18%
Legend
      HTC One X+ NVIDIA Tegra 3, NVIDIA GeForce ULP (Tegra 3), 64 GB SSD
      Samsung Galaxy S3 Samsung Exynos 4412 Quad, ARM Mali-400 MP4, 16 GB SSD
      Apple iPhone 5 Apple A6, PowerVR SGX543MP3, 32 GB SSD
      HTC One X NVIDIA Tegra 3, NVIDIA GeForce ULP (Tegra 3), 32 GB SSD

To evaluate the performance of the internal memory we consult AndroBench 3. Here we see that compared with the Samsung flagship Galaxy S3, the HTC One X+ does a little better in all disciplines. Against the Google Nexus 4, however, which counts among one of the best in this test, the One X+ lies too far behind to even have its competitor in its line of vision. 

AndroBench 3
Sequential Read 256KB
HTC One X+
36.88 MB/s ∼22%
Samsung Galaxy S3
38.08 MB/s ∼23% +3%
Google Nexus 4
49.7 MB/s ∼30% +35%
Sequential Write 256KB
HTC One X+
13.45 MB/s ∼23%
Samsung Galaxy S3
7.44 MB/s ∼13% -45%
Google Nexus 4
13.97 MB/s ∼24% +4%
Random Read 4KB
HTC One X+
9.99 MB/s ∼48%
Samsung Galaxy S3
7.13 MB/s ∼34% -29%
Google Nexus 4
12.14 MB/s ∼58% +22%
Random Write 4KB
HTC One X+
0.62 MB/s ∼21%
Samsung Galaxy S3
0.58 MB/s ∼20% -6%
Google Nexus 4
1.07 MB/s ∼37% +73%
Legend
      HTC One X+ NVIDIA Tegra 3, NVIDIA GeForce ULP (Tegra 3), 64 GB SSD
      Samsung Galaxy S3 Samsung Exynos 4412 Quad, ARM Mali-400 MP4, 16 GB SSD
      Apple iPhone 5 Apple A6, PowerVR SGX543MP3, 32 GB SSD
      HTC One X NVIDIA Tegra 3, NVIDIA GeForce ULP (Tegra 3), 32 GB SSD
      Google Nexus 4 Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro APQ8064A, Qualcomm Adreno 320, 16 GB SSD

Games

The smartphone fluidly completed the graphic demo benchmark Epic Citadel, which we just added to our test database. We will only be able to assess the relative value of the device's 48.4 FPS in high-performance mode and 46.2 FPS in high-quality mode when we have more results to compare with those numbers. Epic Citadel is based on the demanding Unreal 3 graphics engine. There is one thing we can already deduce: All currently available 3D games, especially the more demanding games from the custom-made library Tegra Zone, run smoothly and at a high level of detail on the HTC One X+ with its Nvidia GeForce ULP graphics solution. A practical example is the ego-shooter Shadowgun Deadzone (available in the Google PlayStore), which offers impressive effects and always runs fluidly. All in all, the HTC One X+ proves to have a great performance spectrum.

Epic Citadel High Performance
Epic Citadel High Performance
Epic Citadel High Quality
Epic Citadel High Quality
Shadowgun Deadzone
Shadowgun Deadzone

Sound Quality

Here our review device is no different from the previously reviewed HTC One X. For this reason we refer you to our extensive review of the predecessor for more information. On the whole the HTC One X+ performs well and reproduces very intelligible speech.

Emissions

As is true of the speech quality, the sound quality of the HTC One X+ is no different from that of the HTC One X. The speaker offers a sound that lacks bass and is dominated by treble with subdued mid-tones. But in comparison with other devices, the sound is still tolerable at maximum volume. Directly set against the iPhone 5, our review device's loudspeaker doesn't need to go into hiding.

But the 3.5 mm jack promises higher sound quality. With a capacity for high volume with little background noise and a BeatsAudio equalizer, the jack can win you over. Of course some respectable headphones or a good headset is a prerequisite. HTC should have stuck with the BeatsAudio-licensed headset from their HTC Sensation XL, since the stereo headset that comes with the One X+ has a disappointingly thin sound and is therefore only suited for phone calls.

Temperature

The surface temperatures of the HTC One X+ are nearly identical to those of the predecessor One X. At idle and when running easy applications the surfaces warm to an average of 29 °C (84 °F). The highest measurement taken was 31 °C (88 °F) on the top surface. At those values the temperatures are low to the touch.

If the smartphone is under load, the Tegra 3+ processor and the other components emit considerably more heat into the case. We measured a maximum of 47 °C (116.6 °F) on the bottom surface; the display side reached a maximum of 47.2 °C (117 °F). On average the smartphone warms to around 43 °C (109 °F). Subjectively, however, these values aren't of much consequence. There is no scenario in which the surfaces heat up so much that you don't want to hold the device in your hand. Subjectively, smartphones with aluminum casing like the iPhone 5 feel much more uncomfortable under full load. Interestingly, the HTC One X heated up a little more in some areas, but on the whole remained about 2 °C (3.6 °F) cooler. This is certainly due to the One X's weaker processor and said component's lower level of heat emission.

Max. Load
 46.3 °C42.8 °C41.8 °C 
 47.2 °C42.9 °C42.2 °C 
 45.5 °C42.9 °C40.0 °C 
Maximum: 47.2 °C
Average: 43.5 °C
46.5 °C44.6 °C35.1 °C
46.9 °C46 °C39 °C
47 °C45.9 °C38.3 °C
Maximum: 47 °C
Average: 43.3 °C
Power Supply (max.)  50.7 °C | Room Temperature 21.9 °C | Voltcraft IR-350

Battery Life

As in the HTC One X, in the successor One X+ a quad-core SoC from the Tegra 3 family is at work. The Tegra 3+ also has an extra power-saving core, called a Companion Core. This core works when the device is under a low level of load or in idle mode. Because its maximum clocking frequency of 500 MHz is comparably low, the core significantly reduces the smartphone's power usage. In idle state the HTC One X+ requires between 0.5 and 1.6 Watts, values similarly low as the One X.

Naturally these numbers increase under load. Under full load in the Stability Test, with maximum display brightness and active wireless modules, our Voltcraft VC 940 measuring device revealed a power requirement of only 4.4 Watts. The One X consumed a full 32 percent more, though the One X does have a brighter panel. The Samsung Galaxy S3, with its Exynos 4 quad SoC, is content with a maximum of 3.4 Watts. The undefeated power-saving master is still the iPhone 5 with a thrifty maximum power draw of 2.9 Watts.

Power Consumption

Off / Standby 0.0 / 0.1 Watt
Idle 0.5 / 1.2 / 1.6 Watt
Load 3.7 / 4.4 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         Voltcraft VC 940

HTC also improved the efficiency of their new device compared to their old HTC One X. HTC promises an up to 37 percent increase in battery life, which would enable you to talk on the phone up to 4.7 hours longer. In place of the old 1800 mAh lithium-polymer battery, HTC has now introduced an equivalent with 2100 mAh.

We tested the maximum battery life at minimum brightness and activated energy-saving mode (here, according to your wishes, the HTC One X+ limits the CPU usage as well as the brightness and deactivates both vibrations and data connections). The test ended after around 20 hours. In comparison to the HTC One X that's an increase of 2.3 hours -- so only 11.5 percent more. In the more practical WLAN test, in which the luminosity is set to 55 percent and the energy-saving mode is active, web surfing is simulated using a script that automatically loads various websites. Here the test device ran for a total of 10 hours and 58 minutes, which is about 2 hours longer than the One X.

In the Stability Test, which is less relevant for normal daily use, all four cores of the Tegra 3+ SoC are used to capacity, the display brightness is set to its maximum, and the wireless modules are activated. Here the HTC One X+ lasts a respectable 2 hours and 18 minutes. In this test the HTC One X gave up after just 1 hour and 52 minutes, so about 19 percent less time. The Samsung Galaxy S3 (also with a 2100 mAh battery) and the iPhone 5 (with a 1440 mAh battery) form the competition in this arena. As to be expected, with a maximum battery life of 22 hours and 20 minutes the iPhone 5 lies a little ahead of the competition. The Galaxy S3 doesn't do quite as well as our test device, even though its battery power is equal to that of the One X+. It does overtake the One X+, however, when it comes to the minimum battery run time. In the important WLAN test the iPhone 5 remains the unchallenged winner, but the Galaxy S3 falls far behind, running 2.5 hours shorter.

In terms of the talk time in 3G mode, at 8 hours and 31 minutes the HTC One X+ offers nearly the same talk time as the iPhone 5.

Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
20h 00min
WiFi Surfing
10h 58min
Load (maximum brightness)
2h 18min

Verdict

HTC One X+ Smartphone
HTC One X+ Smartphone

Even the HTC One X+ doesn't represent the perfect smartphone. Our extensive review shows, however, that it can certainly compete with the best cell phones currently on the market. The well-manufactured One X+ with its attractive design is complemented by its potent Tegra 3+ quad-core SoC and the resulting powerful application and graphics performance. The bright SLCD2 IPS panel with sharp imaging, crisp colors and high viewing-angle stability is also appealing. On the whole we also like the smartphone's fluid and simple operation with the current Android operating system, including the intuitive HTC Sense user interface. The mass storage is sufficiently large with 64 GB (net 55 GB), though unfortunately it can't be supplemented by a memory card. Instead HTC offers 25 GB of additional storage space in the cloud via Dropbox. The short distance radio NFC is also on board. In general the wireless modules have a respectable signal strength. Worthy of mention are also the device's low energy consumption and therefore long battery life, the low weight of 140 grams (~0.31 pounds) considering its size and the smartphone's comfortable feel. Another plus is the great camera module, which can take excellent photos and video recordings in good lighting situations.

Negatives are the tonally-weak stereo headset and the power button with a somewhat spongy feel. If you can do without LTE and a card reader, you can currently find the HTC One X+ and its whole package for a street price of around 550 Euros (~740 dollars) -- which means it doesn't have to fear many competitors. Alternatives in the flagship battle are the Samsung Galaxy S3 and the Apple iPhone 5HTC One X owners will have to thoughtfully weigh whether the slight improvements are worth a new purchase.

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Specifications

HTC One X+

:: Processor
:: Memory
1024 MB
:: Graphics adapter
:: Display
4.7 inch 16:9, 1280x720 pixel, 720p, SLCD2, IPS, glossy: yes
:: Harddisk
64 GB SSD, 64 GB Integrated memory
:: Connections
1 Docking Station Port, Audio Connections: Audio-In, 3.5 mm stereo jack, Beats Audio speakers, Sensors: Gyro sensor, g-sensor, digital compass, proximity sensor, ambient light sensor, Micro-USB 2.0 with MHL-HDMI (DLNA) over an optional adapter, NFC
:: Networking
802.11a/b/g/n (a b g n ), 4.0 Bluetooth, HSPA/WCDMA 850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz
:: Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 8.9 x 69.9 x 134.4
:: Weight
0.14 kg Power Supply: 0.055 kg
:: Battery
Lithium-Polymer, 2100 mAh, integrated
:: Price
649 Euro
:: Operating System
Android 4.1 Jelly Bean
:: Additional features
Webcam: 8 Megapixel Camera, 1080p, 1.6 Megapixel Front Camera, 720p , Packaging: Smartphone, USB data cable, power adapter, HTC RC-E190 stereo headset, documents, HTC Sense 4+, 7digital, Car, Dropbox, Facebook, Google+, HTC Hub, PDF Viewer, Polaris Office, SoundHound, Twitter, TuneIn Radio, 24 Months Warranty

 

In review: HTC's new flagship, the One X+.
In review: HTC's new flagship, the One X+.
The new PassMark mobile performance test...
The new PassMark mobile performance test...
The smartphone's speakers are located on the lower backside of the device.
The smartphone's speakers are located on the lower backside of the device.
Like the iPhone 5, in their One X+ HTC uses a SIM-card slot that can be opened using either a paper-clip or a tool they include in the packaging.
Like the iPhone 5, in their One X+ HTC uses a SIM-card slot that can be opened using either a paper-clip or a tool they include in the packaging.
...around the camera's border and the BeatsAudio logo.
...around the camera's border and the BeatsAudio logo.
The usual touch keys underneath the screen glow in red...
The usual touch keys underneath the screen glow in red...
The display produces sharp and brilliant image content.
The display produces sharp and brilliant image content.
Geekbench 2 benchmark system information.
Geekbench 2 benchmark system information.
...system information.
...system information.
Android reveals extensive...
Android reveals extensive...
Both are very pressure-resistant, only the HTC One X+ has a rubberized, dirt-resistant backside.
Both are very pressure-resistant, only the HTC One X+ has a rubberized, dirt-resistant backside.
The cases are made of polycarbonate and aluminum.
The cases are made of polycarbonate and aluminum.
...of the competitor from Cupertino.
...of the competitor from Cupertino.
...the low overall height...
...the low overall height...
HTC One X+: 4.7 inches; iPhone 5: 4 inches. In direct comparison with the iPhone 5 we see...
HTC One X+: 4.7 inches; iPhone 5: 4 inches. In direct comparison with the iPhone 5 we see...
The most important accessories are included in the packaging.
The most important accessories are included in the packaging.
...is similar to the old Windows equivalent.
...is similar to the old Windows equivalent.

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Links

  • Manufacturer's information

Pro

+Attractive design & case
+64 GB internal storage space (net ~55 GB)
+25 GB Dropbox storage space (2 years)
+NFC
+Android 4.1 with HTC Sense UI 4+
+Strong wireless module
+Camera module (8 megapixel, video recording in 1080p, LED flash)
+High resolution SLCD2 IPS touchscreen with good luminosity
+Precise and quick input devices
+Strong application and graphics performance
+Low power requirements
 

Cons

-Missing LTE support
-No card reader for storage expansion
-Stereo headset with unimpressive sound
-Power button's reaction somewhat unclear

Shortcut

What we like

The Tegra 3+ processor's performance, the intuitive HTC Sense user interface and the great 720p display.

What we'd like to see

In the new top model we would like to have seen LTE and a card reader at long last.

What surprises us

The good battery life even with the strong components.

The competition

Alongside the predecessor HTC One X (and with LTE the HTC One XL), the HTC One X+ mainly has to compete with the Samsung Galaxy S3 and the Apple iPhone 5.

Rating

HTC One X+
08/05/2013 v3
Michael Moser

Chassis
88%
Keyboard
54%
Pointing Device
92%
Connectivity
40%
Weight
100%
Battery
96%
Display
86%
Games Performance
35%
Application Performance
52%
Temperature
81%
Noise
100%
Add Points
90%
Average
76%
88%
Smartphone *
Weighted Average

> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review HTC One X+ Smartphone
Author: Michael Moser, 2013-02-16 (Update: 2013-06- 6)